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Buongiorno! You've arrived at the place in the blogosphere where three exciting Christian Mom communities meet together under one roof. With over 500 subscribers and followers, there's a cup of goodness in the Chrysalis Cafe for everyone.

I’m e-Mom your hostess. As a seasoned Titus Two woman, you'll find me serving up "thinkful" content for Christian wives here at Chrysalisღ weblog every other week ...

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Sunday, February 10, 2013

Ancient Jewish Marriage Customs

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The Engagement: A Pledge of Faithfulness

Do not let your hearts be troubled. Trust in God; trust also in me. In my Father's house are many rooms; if it were not so, I would have told you. I am going there to prepare a place for you. And if I go and prepare a place for you, I will come back and take you to be with me that you also may be where I am. (John 14:1-3 NIV)


In the Gospels, Jesus relied on the ancient Jewish marriage pattern to illustrate many of his parables. We see this marriage pattern climax in the promises he gave to his disciples at the Last Supper (see passage above). Many Christians miss the full impact of these allusions in relation to his Second Coming because they're not familiar with ancient Jewish wedding practices.

The following excerpt quoted from 
followtherabbi.com gives us much insight.


The Bridegroom Waits & Prepares


"In ancient Israel, when it was time for a man and woman to marry, both fathers would negotiate the bride price to compensate the bride-to-be’s family [for the loss of her valuable services]. After exchanging a glass of wine to seal the agreement, the couple was formally engaged.

The young man then told his fiancée, in effect, 'I’m going home to my father’s house to prepare a place for you. When I’m finished, I’ll return and take you to be my wife.'

The son (typically in his mid-twenties) would then build a new house on his father’s existing one. As generations married and built their houses onto the original one, they created a housing complex called an insula. Here, family members ate, worked, and lived together …

As the son worked on his new home, he eagerly awaited his father’s final approval. Only the father could decide when the building was finally complete.


The Bride Waits & Prepares 

As her fiancé prepared a new home, the bride-to-be (typically fourteen years old) would remain at her parents’ home, preparing wedding clothes and learning homemaking skills.

During this time, she was known in the community as 'one who had been bought with a price.' She might wait six months, nine months, or even longer for her fiancé to return; no one know the exact time when he would come for her.

Eventually, she would hear the sound of the shofar [ram's horn] as her bridegroom entered her village and announced that their wedding day had arrived. The wise bride was well-prepared for her groom’s arrival.


Christian Significance


These insights help us to understand how wonderful heaven and our eternal relationship with God will be. When Jesus spoke of the kingdom of heaven, he compared himself to a bridegroom who was engaged to be married.

'I love you as my bride,' he said, in effect, 'so I’ll pay the bride price. I’ll give up my life for you. I’ll go to my father’s house where there are many rooms to prepare a place for you. One day I’ll return and take you to be with me forever in heaven.'

Jesus’ Second Coming will be like the long-awaited arrival of a bridegroom … And heaven will be like a joyous wedding reception, celebrating the love between a husband and a wife."


At Last, the Wedding Ceremony


A thorough explanation of ancient Jewish marriage customs
can be read under Marriage” in Smith’s online Bible Dictionary. Worth quoting are the following points:


1. The essence of the marriage ceremony consisted in the removal of the bride from her father's house to that of the bridegroom or his father. The bridegroom prepared himself for the occasion by putting on a festive dress, and especially by placing on his head a handsome nuptial turban. ( Psalms 45:8 ; Song of Solomon 4:10: Song of Solomon 4:11 )

2. The bride was veiled. Her robes were white, ( Revelation 19:8 ) and sometimes embroidered with gold thread, ( Psalms 45:13Psalms 45:14 ) and covered with perfumes ( Psalms 45:8 ) she was further decked out with jewels. ( Isaiah 49:18 ; 61:10 ; Revelation 21:2 )

3. When the fixed hour arrived, which was, generally late in the evening, the bridegroom set forth from his house, attended by his groomsmen (Authorized Version "companions," ( Judges 14:11 ) "children of the bride-chamber," ( Matthew 9:15 ) preceded by a band of musicians or singers, ( Genesis 31:27 ; Jeremiah 7:34 ; 16:9 ) and accompanied by persons wearing flambeaux, ( Jeremiah 25:10; Matthew 25:7 ; Revelation 18:23 ) and took the bride with the friends to his own house.

4. At the house a feast was prepared, to which all the friends and neighbors were invited, ( Genesis 29:22 ; Matthew 22:1-10 ; Luke 14:8 ; John 2:2 ) and the festivities were protracted for seven or even fourteen days ( Judges 14:12 ; Job 8:19 ). The guests were provided by the host with fitting robes, ( Matthew 22:11 ) and the feast was enlivened with riddles, ( Judges 14:12 ) and other amusements.

5. The last act in the ceremonial was the conducting of the bride to the bridal chamber, ( Judges 15:1 ; Joel 2:16 ) where a canopy was prepared ( Psalms 19:5 ; Joel 2:16 ). The bride was still completely veiled, so that the deception practiced on Jacob, ( Genesis 29:23 ) was not difficult.

In light of this information, many Scripture passages make much more sense. Think about Jesus' Parable of the Ten Virgins (an allusion to ten bridesmaids in Matt 25:1-13) and the Parable of the Great Feast (a wedding feast in Matt 22:1-14). Can you think of others?

Photos: Biblical Archaeology Review & eliel.schafler (Flickr)




It’s Marriage Monday! Please Join Us

Group Topic: "OPEN." If you would like to link a post today, take a minute to read the explanation of today's topic.

Don't forget to leave a brief comment! BTW, you might have strong feelings about this post. As a courtesy to others, please refrain from expressing them here, especially for the sake of those who might be new. This is your chance to blog your heart out, Sister.

Test Your Link. You’re welcome to add your link any time up until eleven PM MT on Wednesday. Please include a text link back to Chrysalis, or you can use one of these graphic buttons instead.


If you're new at Chrysalis, welcome! Please accept my invitation to join our Marriage Monday community. You might want to read an introduction to this
Blog Hop
and find out how to
join the Marriage Monday Blog List.


Thanks for linking at Chrysalis today, sweet Sister!

Linky


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Thursday, February 7, 2013

Marriage Monday is Coming!

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Open Topic

You're invited to join us for Marriage Monday on February 11, 2013. Let's have a FREE DAY this time around, shall we? No specific topic—just write what's "top of mind." For example, have you learned something new about Christian marriage recently? Care to share?

If cinnamon hearts, red roses, and dark chocolate are front and center in your conciousness, so be it! Maybe you'd like to tell us what you're thinking. For example, how are you planning celebrate February 14 this year? Do you and your husband include your kids in your celebration? Or maybe you have a funny Valentine's Day story from your courtship. 

For the past few months, I've been studying the Book of Revelation (Precepts) every Tuesday night at our church. There's a lot to keep straight, and many other Scripture passages also come into play. I'm planning to review some things about ancient Jewish wedding customs and how they relate to "The Bride of Christ" in my post. You might feel led to cover some aspect of the timeless biblical love story too. Are there any passages which are particularly meaningful to you right now?

I hope you'll be able to join us on Monday. Here's your chance to blog your heart out, Sister!

See you here at Chrysalis very soon.

In my Father's house are many rooms; if it were not so, I would have told you. I am going there to prepare a place for you. (John 14:2 NIV)




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Sunday, January 27, 2013

Our Sacred Commitment

9 Comments

Welcome to Marriage Monday!

How Marriage Works:
21 Secrets Every Couple Needs to Know

Secret #18: Commitment is our sure promise that provides security and stability during a marriage crisis. 

Q. What do circus high wire acts and marriage have in common?
(Besides extreme trust, interlaced body parts, and shiny red suits ... )

In a marriage, one has the opportunity to create a legacy or fall prey to divorce. The tragic thing about divorce is that it affects SO many more people than just the couple involved. Our life road is mapped out by the choices we make. My husband and I desire a strong, everlasting marriage, being wise to the roadblocks that may come our way. However, we chose marriage and we continue to chose marriage everyday. We are blessed to share in a union that God has created for us.Katy Montgomery

A. A safety net! Both marriage and high wire acts require a very strong safety net below the surface to provide security and protection against missteps, sudden mishaps, and mistakes.


You Can Rebuild Happiness in Your Marriage

In marriage, that safety net is good old-fashioned commitment. Commitment is the critical undergirding that keeps couples and their families safe from disaster. When communication fails, disease strikes, or economic hardships arrive, our commitment to one another allows our marriage to temporarily fall off the high wire of happiness. Commitment keeps it from shattering to pieces on the ground.

God intended for married couples to experience great happiness within their exclusive union. But isn’t marriage intended to make us holy you might ask? Yes. Of course. But should we gain the knowledge and skills to achieve a measure of happiness in marriage? Again, the answer is absolutely—Yes.

We know that life has its good times and bad times. Similarly, happiness in marriage ebbs and flows. Sometimes we’re able traverse the high wire of daily life in perfect harmony, laughing, and enjoying each other from one end to the other. Unfortunately, because of sin, our marriages face difficulties and hardships too. During those crisis periods, we get out of balance as a couple. Bailing out and starting over with someone else can seem like a very attractive idea.

Both marriage and high wire acts require a very strong safety net below the surface to provide security and protection against missteps, sudden mishaps, and mistakes.


However, like the undergirding of a circus safety net, our strength of commitment allows us to stay together through the difficult days, while working toward a better tomorrow. When negative circumstances force us off the high wire of marital happiness and down into the safety net of commitment, we can be assured that God will help us find a way to climb up the ladder of happiness once again.

From Faith to Hope, and Then On to Love

Christian marriage counselor, Willard Harley PhD observed that couples who are in love, never divorce. His successful clinical work has focused on helping distressed marriage partners fill each other's “emotional love tanks” in order to fall in love again.

In light of Dr. Harley’s counseling success, you can picture of commitment as both the safety net and the high wire itself. Commitment acts like a bridge between two opposite extremes: an angry divorce and long-term marital satisfaction. Commitment gives us the necessary time during and afer a marriage crisis to traverse the wire from one side to the other. Commitment empowers a couple to carefully proceed away from a state of conflict and toward the balanced state of relational happiness they both long for.

Commitment acts like faith, for it fuels hope. And hope can lead you back to loveif you allow it to. If your marriage is in turmoil, you may be considering your options. I encourage you to fufill your sacred marriage vows, and say NO to the temptation file for divorce. But don't go it alone! Seek the help of a competent professional today.

Related

Marriage: What Makes Women Happy?
Is Marriage for Happiness or Holiness?
Does Divorce Make People Happy?

Photos: gynti_46 (Flickr)

Take heed then to your spirit, and let no one deal treacherously against the wife of your youth. For I hate divorce,” says the Lord, the God of Israel, “and him who covers his garment with wrong,” says the Lord of hosts. “So take heed to your spirit, that you do not deal treacherously.” (Mal 2:15-16 NASB)
 





It’s Marriage Monday! Please Join Us

Group Topic: "Commitment." If you would like to link a post today, take a minute to read the introduction to today's topic.

Don't forget to leave a brief comment! BTW, you might have strong feelings about this post. As a courtesy to others, please refrain from expressing them here, especially for the sake of those who might be new. This is your chance to blog your heart out, Sister.

Test Your Link. You’re welcome to add your link any time up until eleven PM MT on Wednesday. Please include a text link back to Chrysalis, or you can use one of these graphic buttons instead.

If you're new at Chrysalis, welcome! Please accept my invitation to join our Marriage Monday community. You might want to read an introduction to this
Blog Hop
and find out how to
join the Marriage Monday Blog List.

Thanks for linking at Chrysalis today, sweet Sister!

Linky

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Thursday, January 24, 2013

Marriage Monday is Coming!

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Topic: Commitment in Christian Marriage

Hello! You're invited to join us this Monday (January 28, 2013). Here's another opportunity learn from each another about our most important human relationship: marriage. Unfortunately, in our culture, divorce has become the default option when the going gets really tough.

Sister, let's dig deeply on this one. While divorce is not the "unpardonable sin," the experts say there are numerous down sides to splitting up the family unit. Search your heart, the Scriptures, and tell us why you've decided to honor your marriage commitment, no matter what.

The old saying "an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure" has never been more appropriate. Thinking and writing about commitment today just might keep your marriage outside the danger zone at some point in the future. 


Five writing prompts, in case you need them:

1. Q4U: What's the relationship between commitment and forgiveness?

2. Show us how HOPE undergirds your marriage commitment.

3. Discuss the research which shows how a couple's friends influences their marriage. For example, Christian couples who regularly fellowship with others in stable marriages also tend to stay together. (Sadly, the reverse is true as well.)

4. Do you agree or disagree with this statement? "It makes good sense to stay together for the sake of the children."

5. T or F? Married people tend to enjoy a higher standard of living, better mental and physical health, and live longer than single or divorced people.

6. Hindsight is always 20/20. If you are divorced (and have remarried), tell us what you wish you had done differently.

Love and blessings,

e-Mom



Nine Ways Writing About Marriage Changes Things

1. Writing about marriage changes how we think. It clarifies our feelings and encourages us to seek God's Truth. (All Scripture is inspired by God and is profitable for teaching... 2 Tim 3:16)

2. Writing about marriage makes us wonder what the experts have to say. (With an abundance of counselors there is safety... Prov 11:14)

3. Writing about marriage causes us to reflect on our experience. It gives us the desire to teach others what we've learned. (Teach them to your children and your grandchildren... Deut 4:8-9)

4. Writing about marriage is a safe way to blow off steam. (Don't let the sun go down on your anger... Eph 4:26)

5. Writing about marriage helps us to remember that everyone makes mistakes. We can learn from them and move forward. (All have sinned... Rom 3:23)

6. Writing about marriage reminds us that there will always be areas in our marriage that need improvement. (The ear of the wise seeks knowledge... Prov 18:15)

7. Writing about marriage teaches us about self-control. Alone with the page, we discover we have the power to change the behavior of only one person: ourselves. (Fruit of the spirit is love, joy... and self-control. Gal 5:22-23)

8. Writing about marriage can be a form of prayer. Often, when we write about our problems, our spirit opens up to hear God's answers. (Ask, seek, knock... Matt 7:7)

9. Writing about marriage increases our gratitude for the life partner God has given us. (A good wife is from the Lord... Prov 19:14)

Photo: ThePugFather (Flickr)


Will you be here at Chrysalis on Monday?

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Sunday, January 13, 2013

Sharing Our Faith in Marriage

10 Comments

Welcome to Marriage Monday!

How Marriage Works:
21 Secrets Every Couple Needs to Know

Secret #17: Christian husbands often express their faith through their actions rather than with words.

Q. Why doesn't my husband initiate prayer together more often?


My husband and I both believe in the Lord, and love Him. But, our way of expressing that love, and belief, are very different. I love going to church, singing in the choir, teaching, being involved in prayer groups, revivals, any type of church activity. My husband does not want to go to church, or when he does go to church, does not want to be involved in any way. All he does is warm the pew. I enjoy Bible studies, and devotions. He does not, and will not, participate in any type of Bible study. I love to pray, he will pray occasionally.Denise


A. Excellent question! We know intuitively that spirituality comes more naturally to women—or at least our brand of spirituality. As the verbal gender, women place greater emphasis on love, forgiveness, and relationships. So when we're born-again, the heavens open! Oh happy day! God loves us! When we fall head over heels in love with Jesus, we begin to walk the road of life with Him right by our side. Prayer, Bible study, witnessing, and intimate fellowship with other believers soon seem as easy as breathing.

However, many men struggle with “our way” as the only way to express faith. Factoring in our gender differences and our unique spiritual gifts, we should expect that some husbands will have a limited appetite for sharing their spiritual selves with their wives using words.

Faith Begins with God's Word
So faith comes from hearing, and hearing by the word of Christ. 
(Rom 110:17 NASB)

For some women, this is a tremendous source of frustration. Many of us want our husbands to be spiritually identical to us; ie. eager to pray; knowledgeable in Scripture; leading regular family devotions; attending church every Sunday; witnessing on the mission field; and maybe even making plans to enter full-time ministry.

Some of us are married to pastors who actually do all these things
(a major blessing),
and some of us are married to unbelievers. But I know that there are many, many times when our believing husbands are shouting that they love the Lord very loudly in their own language—by what they're doing. It's very easy to completely miss the good things they are trying to say to us about their faith walk.

Faith is Revealed by Good Works
But someone will say, “You have faith; I have deeds.” Show me your faith without deeds, and I will show you my faith by my deeds. (James 2:18 NIV)

For instance, when our children were small, I remember going through a particularly difficult period financially. The economy was down, and our small business was suffering. I of course, spent much time journalling, praying, and in Bible study, trying to assuage my fears and grow my faith in God's promises of provision.

To my great surprise, my husband—a strong believer—took a different tack. Mindful of his God-given responsibility to provide for our family, he buckled down and started working very long hours. Once in awhile, he would quote 1 Tim 5:8 to me: “But if anyone does not provide for his own, and especially for those of his household,
he has denied the faith and is worse than an unbeliever.”  Oh my! That's strong stuff!

At first I was perplexed. Aren't we saved by faith? And shouldn't e-Dad and I be banded together and down on our knees “storming the gates of heaven” a whole lot more? Eventually, I realized that working hard to be a successful provider was e-Dad's response to Jesus' free gift of salvation. Careful obedience to the truth as he understood it, was a sincere expression of his faith to me and to our family.
 

Loquatious Ladies Love to Pray

It’s no secret that women are more loquatious (verbal) than men. In fact, thanks to our chattiness, we’re on the receiving end of numerous bad jokes. (You’ve heard of the tel-e-phone? What do you do when you want to get the word out really fast? Tel-a-woman. Groan.) We’re often drawn to prayer—a verbal activity—much more than our husbands.

Another reason men don’t pray with their wives regularly is because they don’t like admitting their vulnerability. Few men relish the idea of climbing down from their white stallion to play the fallen hero. Most husbands need to feel very secure about their wife’s respect and acceptance before they’ll open up and admit their needs.

Praying in the Afterglow

So take heart, sister! Here's a little challenge for you. If you're frustrated by the infrequency of shared prayer in your marriage—and many women are—why don’t you suggest praying right after love-making? There’s a strong chance that in those special moments, your man will be feeling trusted, accepted, and quite open to sharing his spiritual feelings with God and with you.

Related
  1. What's Your God Language? Connecting with God through Your Unique Spiritual Temperament by Myra Perrine. Forward by Gary Thomas.
  2. Introverts in the Church. Finding our Place in an Extroverted Culture by Adam S. McHugh


Photos: MoreGoodFoundation & edgeplot (Flickr)




It’s Marriage Monday! Please Join Us

Group Topic: "Faith in Marriage." You're free to tackle this subject whatever way the Spirit leads. I have not included any writing prompts this week, as I know you have a lot to share on this topic without my input!

Don't forget to leave a brief comment! BTW, you might have strong feelings about this post. As a courtesy to others, please refrain from expressing them here, especially for the sake of those who might be new. This is your chance to blog your heart out, Sister.

Test Your Link. You’re welcome to add your link any time up until eleven PM MT on Wednesday. Please include a text link back to Chrysalis, or you can use one of these graphic buttons instead.

If you're new at Chrysalis, welcome! Please accept my invitation to join our Marriage Monday community. You might want to read an introduction to this Blog Hop and find out how to
join the Marriage Monday Blog List.

Thanks for linking at Chrysalis today, sweet Sister.

Linky
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Sunday, December 9, 2012

Ten Holiday Survival Tips for 2012

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How to Prepare for Dark Feelings During the Season of Light 

Many people are surprised to learn that December can the most painful month of the year. Separation, divorce, illness, death, financial stress or an unwanted move can trigger feelings of loss that can make the holidays very challenging. Watching others absorbed in their merry-making drives home the reality of your loneliness and heartache.

Intellectually, you probably understand that appearances can be deceiving. Most likely, your friends and co-workers are not being completely honest about their own personal struggles. If you are facing difficult times, here are ten suggestions to help you navigate this holiday season.

1. PREPARE. Be prepared for the ambush of negative emotions that can overcome you at anytime. For instance, if Christmas music is stirs up painful feelings, turn it off.

2. ACCEPT. Rather than be angry, accept your loss and the difficulty of this passage through the holidays. Go easy on yourself, taking one day at a time.

3. SOCIALIZE. Force yourself to accept and extend invitations for short outings to events and places you've enjoyed in the past.

4. STAY SOBER. Don't try to numb your pain with alcohol or drugs. These chemicals are depressants, and they add to your misery rather than relieve it.

5. DECORATIONS. The push to put up holiday greenery and ornaments may be too overwhelming. Buy yourself a bright red poinetta, and save the rest of your decorating for next year.

6. HEALTH. Maintain regular healthy mealtime, exercise, and sleep routines. Sugary foods and beverages can be anxiety-producing, so steer clear of them.

7. SHOP ONLINE. Take advantage of internet discount prices and free delivery if a trip to the crowded malls seems too stressful.

8. SUNSHINE. Short walks outside in the sun is essential for mood elevation during the darkest months of the year. In northern locations like Boston or Seattle, Vitamin D supplementation is advisable.

9. BOUNDARIES. Be honest with friends and family about what you are capable of doing to celebrate Christmas this year.

10. SEEK HELP. If you find you're unable to cope, contact a close friend, women's counselor, or a pastor to help you "vent" your frustrations and heartache.

The Lord is close to the brokenhearted and saves those who are crushed in spirit. (Psalm 34:18 NIV)


Source: Compass Magazine

Photos: Heather's Photostream (Flickr)



The Alabaster Jar TheBetterMom.com


Marriage Monday will be on hiatus until January. Please join us at Chrysalis for the topic of "Faith."


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Sunday, December 2, 2012

How to be a Helpmate in Christian Marriage

7 Comments

Welcome to Marriage Monday!

How Marriage Works:
21 Secrets Every Couple Needs to Know

Secret #16: Men are uniquely designed to be providers, and they deeply need their wives' support.

Q. My husband's business is really struggling, and I'm a Mom who works part-time at home. Should I carry on at home, or go out and find a full-time job?


The one thing that constantly challenges our marriage is... the direction we want to go in... and how to focus on it. As a girl I changed when I got married, as a woman I changed when I had children, and now I'm changing again... trying to figure out where I fit in the world, which in turn affects how I react in my marriage. I still fight against the worldview have "have to" to work instead of staying home with my children (which I'm glad I am privileged enough to do so). I am happy and in love but never sure how I can best serve God - how WE can serve God together.—Anne Onymous

 
A. Great question. Obviously, each marriage is unique. Scripture affirms that
God has variously gifted both men and women.
Both genders are called to share their talents for the benefit of others. But one size does not fit all. It takes lots of time for Christian couples to establish a work life that supports their family and satisfies both of them.
 
 
Why Men Need to Work

The Lord God took the man and put him in the Garden of Eden to work it and take care of it. (Gen 2:15 NIV)

Regardless of their vocation, we know that all women find tremendous fulfillment in their relationships. However, God designed men to find the majority of their fulfillment and identity through their jobs.

In fact, when he's successful in providing for his family, a husband's physical and mental health are optimized, thanks to higher levels of testosterone. Levels of this master hormone can drop significantly when a man suffers a business setback or a job loss.

A worker’s appetite works for him, for his hunger urges him on. (Prov 16:26 NASB)

Unfortunately, many well-meaning wives unknowingly sabotage their husbands' efforts by taking over the reins. However, when a wife encourages her husband to “step up to the plate,” deferring to him as the family's primary bread-winner, everyone wins. In fact, the happiest marriages are those in which the husband earns at least 68% of the family's income.


Learn to Ask “What Can I Do to Help?” 

The Lord God said, “It is not good for the man to be alone. I will make a helper suitable for him.” (Gen 2:18 NIV)

God intended for wives play a key role as their husband's “cheerleader,” especially when a man is struggling to pay the bills. Fortunately, it doesn't take years of theological study or days of prayer and fasting to figure out what to do. A Christian wife can simply practice asking her husband, What can I do to help?” and consistently follow-up on his suggestions. Ultimately her patience, and her supportive attitude will pay big dividends for both of them.


Homemaker or Working Mom

The wise woman builds her house, but with her own hands the foolish one tears hers down. (Prov 14:1 NIV)

This issue of working Moms versus stay-at-home Moms is hotly debated in our culture. Before the economic downturn in 2008, most educated men were earning a livable income. Thus, educated Christian wives had the freedom to choose a career path they deemed most appropriate.

For instance, a significant number of Christian mothers felt called to important positions beyond their own four walls. With two incomes, these families enjoyed a higher standard of living, but it came with a price—including higher stress levels.

On the other hand, many Christian mothers opted to stay home, expressing their gifts to benefit their families and community. The price they paid was the challenge of living on one income in a two-income society. Thanks to technology, entrepreneurial Moms figured out how to bring in extra money working from home.
 



Godly Helpmates in the New Economy

               She considers a field and buys it; out of her earnings she plants a vineyard.
               (Prov 31:16 NIV)
 
Unfortunately today, for many would-be SAHMs the current economy has severely restricted their freedom to choose full-time homemaking as their primary vocation. In many cases, working wives out-earn their husbands, whose jobs have been cut, replaced by technology, or moved overseas. Educated married women are entering the workforce in record numbers simply to make ends meet.

Career women know that working full-time outside the home is a massive juggling act—without a doubt. Some mothers take on the challenge and perform with aplomb. However, Gallup reports that 51% of working mothers say they would prefer to work part-time or not at all.  Perhaps the best course of action for the latter group, is to find full-time work they can do from home.

Bottom line, a wise Christian wife finds creative ways to support her husband in his quest to provide or their family—especially when he's struggling. Asking for his input and consistent follow-through will help him advance in his chosen career. Once he's on his way to success, then she can make some real choices about how to optimize her own talents at home and in the workplace.


Related


This post is linked at Time Warp Wife's Titus2Tuesdays

Photos: LeoReynolds, rpsd, RichardMasoner (Flickr)






It’s Marriage Monday! Please Join Us

Group Topic: "How to Be a Helpmate." If you would like to link a post today, take a minute to read the introduction to today's topic.

Comment Policy. Don't forget to leave a brief comment! BTW, you might have strong feelings about this post. As a courtesy to others, please refrain from expressing them here, especially for the sake of those who might be new. This is your chance to blog your heart out, Sister.

Test Your Link. You’re welcome to add your link any time up until eleven PM MT on Wednesday. Please include a text link back to Chrysalis, or you can use one of these graphic buttons instead.

If you're new at Chrysalis, welcome! Please accept my invitation to join our Marriage Monday community. You might want to read an introduction to this Blog Hop and find out how to join the Marriage Monday Blog List.

Thanks for linking at Chrysalis today, sweet Sister!

Linky

Read More
 

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